Topics

Rocker oil feed T piece


Mick O'Connor
 

Anyone in U.K. got a spare rubber T piece I can buy ?

Mick


Mike Williamson
 

I'm going down the hangar later this week so will check my little box of spares

Mike

----- Original Message -----
From: "Mick O'Connor via groups.io" <mickoconnor909=btinternet.com@groups.io>
To: "JabCamit" <main@jabcamit.groups.io>
Sent: Tuesday, March 16, 2021 11:01 AM
Subject: [JabCamit] Rocker oil feed T piece


Anyone in U.K. got a spare rubber T piece I can buy ?

Mick




Mick O'Connor
 

Thanks

Mick

On 16 Mar 2021, at 13:08, Mike Williamson <mikewilliamson@colorepublic.co.uk> wrote:

I'm going down the hangar later this week so will check my little box of spares

Mike

----- Original Message ----- From: "Mick O'Connor via groups.io" <mickoconnor909=btinternet.com@groups.io>
To: "JabCamit" <main@jabcamit.groups.io>
Sent: Tuesday, March 16, 2021 11:01 AM
Subject: [JabCamit] Rocker oil feed T piece


Anyone in U.K. got a spare rubber T piece I can buy ?

Mick







John Miller
 

I will also check my spares. Do you only need one? I'll send all that I find. Don't need them with gen 4.

John M


Mick O'Connor
 

John, Thanks for the offer. I could do with 2. But Im in England, you OK to post ?

Mick

On 16 Mar 2021, at 14:19, John Miller via groups.io <skypics234@...> wrote:

I will also check my spares. Do you only need one? I'll send all that I find. Don't need them with gen 4.

John M


edmund@...
 

Contact Kevin at CAMit Aero Engines UK https://camitaeroenginesuk.com/about I believe he has a stock of new ones made of better material than the Jabiru ones.
--
Jabiru SK G-EWBC  Builder/Owner with CAMit 2200 and GT Propeller


Mick O'Connor
 

Spoke to Kevin, He wasn’t happy with the quality of the ones he had made. He’s looking for an alternative now.

 

Mick

 

From: main@JabCamit.groups.io [mailto:main@JabCamit.groups.io] On Behalf Of edmund via groups.io
Sent: 16 March 2021 17:31
To: main@JabCamit.groups.io
Subject: Re: [JabCamit] Rocker oil feed T piece

 

Contact Kevin at CAMit Aero Engines UK https://camitaeroenginesuk.com/about I believe he has a stock of new ones made of better material than the Jabiru ones.
--
Jabiru SK G-EWBC  Builder/Owner with CAMit 2200 and GT Propeller


Mike Williamson
 

Hi Mick, been down the hangar today and I'm afraid I dont have any T pieces, Skycraft do have them in stock on their web site
 
Mike

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Tuesday, March 16, 2021 4:31 PM
Subject: Re: [JabCamit] Rocker oil feed T piece

John, Thanks for the offer. I could do with 2. But Im in England, you OK to post ?

Mick

On 16 Mar 2021, at 14:19, John Miller via groups.io <skypics234@...> wrote:

I will also check my spares. Do you only need one? I'll send all that I find. Don't need them with gen 4.

John M


Mick O'Connor
 

Thanks for checking

Mick

On 17 Mar 2021, at 16:47, Mike Williamson <mikewilliamson@...> wrote:

Hi Mick, been down the hangar today and I'm afraid I dont have any T pieces, Skycraft do have them in stock on their web site
 
Mike
----- Original Message -----
Sent: Tuesday, March 16, 2021 4:31 PM
Subject: Re: [JabCamit] Rocker oil feed T piece

John, Thanks for the offer. I could do with 2. But Im in England, you OK to post ?

Mick

On 16 Mar 2021, at 14:19, John Miller via groups.io <skypics234@...> wrote:

I will also check my spares. Do you only need one? I'll send all that I find. Don't need them with gen 4.

John M


Mick O'Connor
 

A friend found that the rocker oil T piece off a Norton ES2 motorcycle fits the Jabiru. Finding it difficult to find out what material they are made out of. Would they be made from a special rubber compound to deal with the heat?
£7 against £42 !!!!

Mick


Pete Twissell
 

The Norton part won't be made of any special rubber, being a 1920s design.
A lot of the modern pattern rubber parts are made from poor quality materials and don't last long.
I wouldn't be confident putting it on a Jab.


On Thu, 18 Mar 2021, 13:57 Mick O'Connor via groups.io, <mickoconnor909=btinternet.com@groups.io> wrote:
A friend found that the rocker oil T piece off a Norton ES2 motorcycle fits the Jabiru. Finding it difficult to find out what material they are made out of. Would they be made from a special rubber compound to deal with the heat?
£7 against £42 !!!!

Mick






jabcamit@...
 

I had an issue with some rubber fuel supply parts being affected by  ethanol. I found suitable parts by submersing different alternatives in neat ethanol for a few days to  to see which were  OK.  

You could test the altenative  T piece by sticking rods in each end, dunking it in hot (max Jab oil temp + say 20degs C) oil for an hour or two and then while hot stressing it by flexing the rods. 

If you have an old Jabiru T piece, boil it in the pot at the same time and do the same tests. It could easily be the case that your alternative is as good as - or better.

Finally you might want to slice both parts open to compare any reinforcing weave that might be incorporated.

BobP


Pete Twissell
 

If testing for ethanol resistance, I would use a mix of ethanol and water.
Much of the issue with ethanol is related to it's absorption of water and the bacteria which grow in the mix.

On Sat, 20 Mar 2021, 11:01 , <jabcamit@...> wrote:
I had an issue with some rubber fuel supply parts being affected by  ethanol. I found suitable parts by submersing different alternatives in neat ethanol for a few days to  to see which were  OK.  

You could test the altenative  T piece by sticking rods in each end, dunking it in hot (max Jab oil temp + say 20degs C) oil for an hour or two and then while hot stressing it by flexing the rods. 

If you have an old Jabiru T piece, boil it in the pot at the same time and do the same tests. It could easily be the case that your alternative is as good as - or better.

Finally you might want to slice both parts open to compare any reinforcing weave that might be incorporated.

BobP


Mark Dunstone
 

I think bacteria, being cellular would have difficulty surviving the osmotic pressure of ethanol even when diluted down to 70%.  I operated a plant and insect quarantine research facility in the late 1970s and 95% ethanol was our standard wash down/disinfectant and desiccant for electron microscopy and Christmas punch booster. We never detected any bacterial contamination, including in the bovine liver, agar & vegemite jell we grew millions of blowfly maggots in before castrating them.  But then again bacteria are known to grow in diesel fuel/water and clog filters.  Just wondering if you guys in the UK detect any bacteria in your scotch, sherry and port?  Probably needs testing.


Mick O'Connor
 

Am I missing something here ? What has ethanol got to do with the rocker oil  feed T piece ?
Mick

On 20 Mar 2021, at 21:05, Mark Dunstone <mark.dunstone@...> wrote:

I think bacteria, being cellular would have difficulty surviving the osmotic pressure of ethanol even when diluted down to 70%.  I operated a plant and insect quarantine research facility in the late 1970s and 95% ethanol was our standard wash down/disinfectant and desiccant for electron microscopy and Christmas punch booster. We never detected any bacterial contamination, including in the bovine liver, agar & vegemite jell we grew millions of blowfly maggots in before castrating them.  But then again bacteria are known to grow in diesel fuel/water and clog filters.  Just wondering if you guys in the UK detect any bacteria in your scotch, sherry and port?  Probably needs testing.


Pete Twissell
 

Bacteria in fuel with ethanol is a problem.
I don't know whether the issue translates to alcoholic drinks, but I don't drink, so personally it doesn't worry me.

https://www.abfad.co.uk/editorial/battling-biofuel-bacteria/

As Mick says, it shouldn't be a problem in the oil feed tee piece.
However, the test might tell something about the material.

Pete.

On Sat, 20 Mar 2021, 21:05 Mark Dunstone, <mark.dunstone@...> wrote:
I think bacteria, being cellular would have difficulty surviving the osmotic pressure of ethanol even when diluted down to 70%.  I operated a plant and insect quarantine research facility in the late 1970s and 95% ethanol was our standard wash down/disinfectant and desiccant for electron microscopy and Christmas punch booster. We never detected any bacterial contamination, including in the bovine liver, agar & vegemite jell we grew millions of blowfly maggots in before castrating them.  But then again bacteria are known to grow in diesel fuel/water and clog filters.  Just wondering if you guys in the UK detect any bacteria in your scotch, sherry and port?  Probably needs testing.


Lyle Passfield
 

Mark there are a few unfinished stories there...

On Sun, 21 Mar 2021 at 08:05, Mark Dunstone <mark.dunstone@...> wrote:
I think bacteria, being cellular would have difficulty surviving the osmotic pressure of ethanol even when diluted down to 70%.  I operated a plant and insect quarantine research facility in the late 1970s and 95% ethanol was our standard wash down/disinfectant and desiccant for electron microscopy and Christmas punch booster. We never detected any bacterial contamination, including in the bovine liver, agar & vegemite jell we grew millions of blowfly maggots in before castrating them.  But then again bacteria are known to grow in diesel fuel/water and clog filters.  Just wondering if you guys in the UK detect any bacteria in your scotch, sherry and port?  Probably needs testing.


Dale
 

That message deserves a reward of some kind ... like "Post Of The Year" ... or something similar! LOL!


Mark Dunstone
 

Quite a few stories actually, Lyle, and only slightly off topic. Probably the image of 100s of young jackaroos and ringers doing the job on the male blowflies under an optical binocular microscope comes to mind.  But, nope, we had to sterilise millions of male flies and so used Wilhelm Rontgen’s invention, x-rays. The best image that comes to my mind is the small disaster when the cooling failed in our 4C room and several million maggots that were in topor ‘woke-up’ and crawled out of their boxes, covering the floor, walls and ceiling with a 50mm render of wriggling maggots.  The fate of the sterile male flies was to be dropped out of a Cessna at 100’agl over a sheep station to copulate with local female flies who would then lay infertile eggs, and this would reduce the population of blow flies and decrease the cost of blowflies on wool and sheep meat production.


Lyle Passfield
 

Ah, so that was you! I remember that campaign. 
Time for you to bring back those highly skilled blowfly desexers. 
We have plenty of blowflies at present due to lots of mice dying of poisoned bait.


On Sun, 21 Mar 2021 at 14:24, Mark Dunstone <mark.dunstone@...> wrote:
Quite a few stories actually, Lyle, and only slightly off topic. Probably the image of 100s of young jackaroos and ringers doing the job on the male blowflies under an optical binocular microscope comes to mind.  But, nope, we had to sterilise millions of male flies and so used Wilhelm Rontgen’s invention, x-rays. The best image that comes to my mind is the small disaster when the cooling failed in our 4C room and several million maggots that were in topor ‘woke-up’ and crawled out of their boxes, covering the floor, walls and ceiling with a 50mm render of wriggling maggots.  The fate of the sterile male flies was to be dropped out of a Cessna at 100’agl over a sheep station to copulate with local female flies who would then lay infertile eggs, and this would reduce the population of blow flies and decrease the cost of blowflies on wool and sheep meat production.